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Run to Failure (RTF)
This is a maintenance strategy or replacement policy, which is sometimes also called “Fit and Forget”.  

An intentional strategy whereby no maintenance tasks are performed on an asset. The only "planned maintenance" on the asset is corrective maintenance after the asset has suffered a failure.  

A conscious decision is made by the owner to neglect the asset, regardless of any signs of Potential Failure ("P") and to wait until the point at which Functional Failure ("F") occurs. 

It is therefore not an unintentional result of an inadequate program, lack of will, inadequate budget, etc. RTF should not be confused with Unintended Failure Replacement (UFR) where the owner did not intend to run the asset to failure.


Attributes
This is a very common approach to the maintenance of components which have the following attributes:

  • No repair is feasible.
  • Short Life Asset - Sometimes short life assets.
  • Disposable Assets - Assets with disposable parts.
  • Low-Materiality Assets - Small assets without significant financial value - low capitalization assets
  • Non-Critical Assets - Assets that are not critical or are inconsequential.
  • Durable Assets - Assets that are not subject to wear or assets that are unlikely to fail
  • Redundant Assets - Redundant assets.
  • Assets that exhibit Random Failure Patterns - Some assets have random failure patterns that cannot be easily anticipated. These assets are stochastic in nature in that their behaviour is non-deterministic, sporadic and random.
  • Non-Maintainable Assets - Some assets are unmaintainable or can be allowed to run to failure with minimal risk to the owner.
  • Discretionary Maintenance - Assets that are not subject to statutory maintenance requirements.
  • Assets with a low utilization index - Asset utilization index.


Variations
Listed below are some of the variations on RTF:

Examples

Some assets may be valid candidates for an RTF strategy, particularly if the asset is:

The following assets may sometimes fall into this category:

  • Sealed insulated glazing units (IGUs)
  • Batteries
  • Baseboard heaters
  • Ceiling tiles
  • Small fractional horsepower recirculating pumps
  • Fences made of pressure treated timber
  • Metal roofs
  • Baseboard heaters
  • Cadet heaters
  • Sealed IGUs
  • Exterior sealant on rain-screen
  • CCTV equipment
  • VFDs
  • Some valves
  • FACP, FAAP
  • Concrete paving
  • Ceiling tiles
  • Raw cedar fencing
  • Interior paintwork
The RTF approach is not to be confused with: RTF is not suitable for assets that are bound by the following:
Evaluation and Management Principles
This approach is best suited to an owner group with the following attributes:
RTF is most appropriate when it is combined with a larger maintenance strategy that seeks an optimal maintenance mix for the different assets.


Asset replacement policies must align to asset risk profiles in order to achieve optimization and satisfy ISO 55001 requirements
Fig.  Asset replacement policies must align to asset risk profiles in order to achieve optimization and satisfy ISO 55001 requirements.


A balanced asset replacement mix helps the organization to achieve optimization in conformity with ISO 55001 principles
Fig. A balanced asset replacement mix helps the organization to achieve optimization in conformity with ISO 55001 principles.


 Run to Failure (RTF) amongst the network of alternative asset replacement policies.
Fig. Run to Failure (RTF) amongst the network of alternative asset replacement policies.


Run to Failure (RTF) is one of the four principal maintenance philosophies
Fig. Run to Failure (RTF) is one of the four principal maintenance philosophies.



P-F interval illustrated with asphalt paving
Fig. The P-F interval illustrated with asphalt paving along the curve.



Illustration of a deterioration model for a roof system.
Fig. Illustration of a deterioration model for a roof system with distress metrics at different life stages.


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Fig. Map of various asset replacement strategies.


I. Care is attempting to slow down or reserve the sands of time so that he can undo the deferred maintenance
Fig. I. Care is attempting to slow down or reserve the sands of time so that he can undo the deferred maintenance. A futile but valiant attempt.



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Fig. Recirculating pumps are sometimes a suitable candidate for a run to failure approach.


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Fig. Blistering in a polyurethane roof assembly.


I. Care spins the wheel of misfortune to determine the consequences of deferred maintenance
Fig. I. Care spins the wheel of misfortune to determine the consequences of deferred maintenance.

Fig. Decision tree on RTF.

See also:
Compare with:


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